Accelerating Net Zero through offshore wind 💨

July 4, 2022

As the climate crisis continues to worsen, many countries across the world are joining the Net Zero movement to reduce their carbon footprint and help tackle climate change.
In the UK, the government has already introduced measures designed to decarbonise the economy and accelerate the transition to clean, affordable energy – the renewables.  
 
Renewable energy is obtained from the Earth’s natural resources and processes that are constantly replenished. As a clean, safe, and efficient source of generating power, its recognition and rapid adoption can be seen worldwide.    
 
In 2019, the UK became the first major economy to pass Net Zero emissions law and commit to ending its contribution to climate change by 2050.  
To support our ambitious targets, the government’s Ten Point Plan for Green Industrial Revolution sets out a robust roadmap to reaching Net Zero. The plan focuses on promoting low-carbon transport, innovative technologies, and clean energy such as offshore wind.
 
Britain has long been recognised as the world leader in offshore wind, but when exactly did we turn this noble natural resource into the power-generating technology we know today?  
 
We have been using wind energy ever since records began, relying on the mechanical power it generated to help us grind up grains, propel ships, and draw up water. Although some early examples of windmills date back as far as 500AD, it wasn’t until 1887 that the first windmill for electricity production was built.  
 
Created by Professor James Blyth of Anderson’s College in Glasgow, it was said to have powered his home for an astonishing quarter of a century.    
As the design of wind turbines continued to change and improve, so did their energy output, and soon after, many countries began installing onshore and offshore wind farms.  
In the UK, the first demonstration offshore wind farm was installed back in December 2000 (off the Northumberland coast) and consisted of two large wind turbines. With a rotor diameter of 66m, they were the world’s largest turbines installed offshore at the time.  
 
Since then, the UK has been very successful in expanding wind power and remains one of the largest markets for offshore wind, with more capacity installed than any other country. Britain is also home to the world’s first 2 floating offshore wind farms and intends to scale this up twelvefold.  
 
With 11,000 (on and offshore) turbines currently in operation, in 2020 the UK generated a healthy 24% of its total electricity by using this amazing resource.    
But as the demand for renewables continues to grow, the government is looking to make further investments into wind power and hopes to deliver a third of the UK’s total energy supply through offshore wind by 2030.  
 
There’s no doubt that wind energy, alongside other renewables, can not only reduce our dependency on fossil fuels and offer a long-term solution to the global energy crisis but also help us pave the way to a Net Zero future.

But we have to remember that to reach our ambitious targets and reduce carbon emissions by 2050 we all have to play our part. Every person, every home, and every business can make a positive impact by going Net Zero and lowering their energy consumption.
 
That’s why, together with IMPACT DEVELOPMENTS, IMPACT MODULAR, IMPACT LENDING, and IMPACT WORKING we make it our mission to place-make sustainable, smart and energy-efficient spaces and neighbourhoods to help the UK accelerate its transition to Net Zero.

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